Customer Reviews of “Confessions of an American Sikh”

4.4 out of 5 stars

 

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars You should read this book, December 21, 2012

By

CGarcia – See all my reviews

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This review is from: Confessions of an American Sikh: Locked up in India, corrupt cops & my escape from a “New Age” tantric yoga cult! (Paperback)

Gursant Singh shares his personal story of how he grew up in a Christian family, found Sikhism, and then found Sikhism again. The perspective that Gursant Singh shares in this book is necessary to understand for anyone who wants to capture a complete picture of what it means to be Sikh. If you are Sikh, you should read this book. If you are interested in Sikhism, you should read this book. If you know a Sikh, you should read this book. Anyone interested in India should read this book. Anyone who knows about Yogi Bhajan, should read this book. And above all, anyone who wants to read a wonderful true story of adventure and discovery should read this book. This is one of the best books I have ever read.

-Chris, Sacramento CA

 

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars Admiration for Gursant’s candor, December 19, 2012

By

Namaste53 (East Coast USA) – See all my reviews

This review is from: Confessions of an American Sikh: Locked up in India, corrupt cops & my escape from a “New Age” tantric yoga cult! (Kindle Edition)

I could not stop reading this book. It is at different times as funny as an oldtime Keystone Cops movie, heartwrenching, heartstopping, compelling and frustrating. I admire the author for his willingness to express, with frankness and candor, his strengths, his weaknesses, his foibles.

 

For about 12 years, I have had an on-and-off fascination with Kundalini yoga, the beautiful Western Sikh mantra music, and certain aspects of the associated lifestyle. It was eye opening to read the author’s journey toward seeing his long-held beliefs, his chosen and cherished lifestyle, his world in a very different light. It took courage for him to express his struggles and his newfound commitment to his beloved faith.

 

A common Sikh mantra is Sat Nam, which is sometimes translated as I am Truth, or Truth is my Identity. The author indeed speaks his own heartfelt Truth, no matter the consequences. Kudos to you, Gursant. Well done. Some of your struggles made me think of the famous words from the hymn Amazing Grace: I once was lost but now I’m found, was blind but now I see…

 

 

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars A Rip-Roaring Good Read!, December 22, 2012

By

Shorty Longfellow – See all my reviews

This review is from: Confessions of an American Sikh: Locked up in India, corrupt cops & my escape from a “New Age” tantric yoga cult! (Kindle Edition)

A fast moving, absolutely gripping, funny and scary book about India and about an unusual American, Gursant Singh, who was raised Christian and educated in military schools. He became an accomplished sharp shooter. He joined the Yogi Bhajan “Sikh” and Kundalini Yoga cult. He became a Sikh, and became a crook.

 

After failing at two cult marriages, Gursant Singh is through with independent American women and seeking an ideal Indian Sikh woman who he imagines as quiet, serviceful, supportive and willing to stay with him, no matter if he is a good or bad man. To that end he meets with over fifty Sikh women, young and old, desperate enough to marry him. In India, we learn, widows and divorcees are burdens on their families and socially shunned. Thus, for them, it is better to be married to a bad man than not married at all. Gursant Singh almost gets engaged several times along the way before, and even after, he gets conned by his marriage broker and ends up in a squalid Indian jail, with no hope of justice in sight.

 

Gursant Singh is a constantly swinging paradox. One moment he is caught up in religious devotion, soaking up the wonders at Darbar Sahib, (known as the Golden Temple, a central Gurdwara of Sikhs everywhere), the next moment he is giving tours there, so he can meet women. One moment he is arrogant, like he is God’s gift to Sikhs and women, with dreams of being a famous spiritual teacher with many followers, next moment he is humbly aware of his many failures and slowly awakening to the fact that he was mistaught Sikhi in Yogi Bhajan’s cult. Like some Sikhs, and many of Yogi Bhajan’s students, he has a martyr complex, desiring nothing more that to die for the glory of his religion. And like many Americans, Gursant Singh is a natural, innocent, wide eyed, freedom-fighter and troublemaker, and a very easy mark.

 

A rip-roaring good read that I recommend highly.

 

 

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars Best Book about India I have ever read……, December 15, 2012

By

Charanjit Singh “Charan” (Chicago) – See all my reviews

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This review is from: Confessions of an American Sikh: Locked up in India, corrupt cops & my escape from a “New Age” tantric yoga cult! (Kindle Edition)

I ordered the hard copy of your book on thursday and I am still waiting for it. I could not resist myself waiting for the hard copy so I downloaded the kindle version to read it thoroughly. I would say that this book is excellent. I have never read a book in Sikhi which is so well written in English language. And It keeps your interest active in your true story. This book is not confined to Sikhs. This book is for anybody who is interested in India, Yoga, 3HO, Sikhs, Uncle Bhajna, Non Resident Indians (NRIs) finding Indian brides through matchmakers in India. It also gives a first hand account of the situations one has to go through if things go wrong in India. This book documented the true situations when an NRI gets entangled into the labyrinth of corrupt Indian Political, Judicial, Police, Immigration systems. How the Indian Political and Police system can suck each and every penny out of you leaving you abandoned. It is a shame. This is how India works. Thats why I left India. I can not be corrupt. I loved this book because it is your true story and not a fiction. This is a real blockbuster book. Some phrases in the book are so humorous that I could not stop myself laughing for hours. I guarantee that this is one of a book that you have to include in your library. I can clearly see many reflections in the author’s true story which refreshed my old days in India.

 

 

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars Best Book about India I have ever read……,, December 15, 2012

By

Charanjit Singh “Charan” (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This review is from: Confessions of an American Sikh: Locked up in India, corrupt cops & my escape from a “New Age” tantric yoga cult! (Paperback)

I ordered the hard copy of your book on thursday and I am still waiting for it. I could not resist myself waiting for the hard copy so I downloaded the kindle version to read it thoroughly. I would say that this book is excellent. I have never read a book in Sikhi which is so well written in English language. And It keeps your interest active in Gursant’s true story. This book is not confined to Sikhs. This book is for anybody who is interested in India, Yoga, 3HO, Sikhs, Uncle Bhajna, Non Resident Indians (NRIs) finding Indian brides through matchmakers in India. It also gives a first hand account of the situations one has to go through if things go wrong in India. What happens when instead of protecting you and finding the truth about you, Police starts conspiring against you foreigner. When US embassy does not pay any heed to your SOS messages. This book documented the true situations when an NRI gets entangled into the labyrinth of corrupt Indian Political, Judicial, Police, Immigration systems. How the Indian Political and Police system can suck each and every penny out of you leaving you abandoned and you find yourself in the deep shit. It is a shame. But this book represents the true facts which I have personally witnessed when living in India. Thats why I left India. While living in India I never felt that we are independent country. Indian are still slaves of the corrupt political, judicial, immigration system not to mention the police department. I still wonder why India is not in the Top 20 most countries? I can not be corrupt. I loved this book because it is a true story and not a work of fiction. This is a real blockbuster book. Some phrases in the book are so humorous that I could not stop myself laughing for hours. I guarantee that this is one of a book that you have to include in your library and gift to your friends. I can clearly see many reflections in the author’s true story which refreshed my old days in India.

 

 

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars Fun read, December 25, 2012

By

Jaskarn S Atwal – See all my reviews

This review is from: Confessions of an American Sikh: Locked up in India, corrupt cops & my escape from a “New Age” tantric yoga cult! (Paperback)

This was an Excellent book and it was really fun to read! Lots of funny moments throughout the entire book

 

 

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful And Enthralling Tale, December 23, 2012

By

Sardar (USA) – See all my reviews

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This review is from: Confessions of an American Sikh: Locked up in India, corrupt cops & my escape from a “New Age” tantric yoga cult! (Paperback)

This is an enthralling personal narrative. It is written in a pleasant and engaging tone that captures your imagination and carries you along as the author tells his tale. The author is humorous. At a deeper level, this book is a discourse on an American Sikh’s experiences in The Punjab – the homeland of the Sikhs. It is also a book about a long journey of self-discovery over a period of 30 years. The author is candid and truthful about the defects in his character.

 

The author embarks on a quest to find the perfect wife. A quest that goes terribly wrong and lands the author in very serious circumstances. He is cast into prison. Prisons in India are not nice, torture and death are commonplace. Habeas Corpus is unheard off and you can easily wait five years in prison for a court date – unless you have a fat wallet or your father is a euro-lemming. Out on bail, the author discovers the real Sikh faith and realizes that he has spent a long portion of his life in the death grip of a pernicious and evil American cult that misrepresents and exploits the Sikh faith. I am talking about the Yogi Bhajan cult, a nefarious cult started by a Hindu godman. Yogi Bhajan was a petty criminal in India and a cultivated asset of Indian Intelligence Agencies fighting a strategic war against the Sikh nation. In America he hit the payola and built a billion dollar cult empire. By interacting with genuine Sikhs in India, the author was able to escape the matrix of the Yogi Bhajan cult. Of course many people who get ensnared in the web of deceit that is woven by cults are not so lucky and live days of quiet desperation as they attempt to salvage what is left of their shattered lives. The author was at one time a head honcho of this cult and knew the tantric godman intimately. At the apex of his fame Yogi Bhajan compared himself to Christ; which is actually quite humble since many Hindu godmen consider themselves to be God.

 

Personally, the parts of Gursant Singh’s book that I liked the best were his encounters with Bhindranwale and the Sikh militant movement. The author speaks guardedly. Bhindranwale, a preacher from a village, was the thirteenth head of a theological seminary (Damdami Taksal – the true mint) started by Guru Gobind Singh over 300 years ago. The author lands up in the Punjab in 1982 when the Sikh insurgency against the Hindu Indian government is at it’s height. An insurgency in which the Indian Government and it’s para-military forces murdered 200,00 Sikhs in a cold-blooded and calculated campaign of murder, rape, and genocide. It is one of the great unrecorded genocides of the twentieth century. A dangerous time indeed as the author recounts. Like almost all Sikhs, the author expresses great admiration for Bhindranwale. The author recounts that whenever he narrates his experiences with the Lion Bhindranwale, his Sikh audience in India would listen spellbound and express open admiration. Greatness has an entirely unique relish and flavour, and I presume that when you associate with greatness you also become great to some extent.

 

This then is a book about the experiences of the son of an American military officer who grew up in a traditional Christian home. It is the story of an expert rifleman who fell into the clutches of a mind-controlling sect those head was a petty criminal, a sexual philanderer and a consummate con artist. It’s a story about his daring escape from India and his escape from the matrix of the Yogi Bhajan cult. It’s a story about how the author became a real Sikh. And finally, it’s a wonderful fairy-tale as the author finds his true love and happiness.

 

At the battle of Austerlitz, outnumbered almost two to one and cornered on a tiny hilltop, the luminescent Napoleon defeats the combined armies of the Austro-Hungarian, Russian and Prussian empires. Subsequently when asked to comment on one of the greatest battles in the annals of history, Napoleon simply remarks that the pen is mightier than the sword. This is one of those books which proves Napoleon’s adage and I unreservedly recommend this book to all readers and to Sikhs in particular. Like any good book, Gursant Singh’s book will teach you something entirely new.

 

 

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful

4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting and worth reading, but horribly misogynistic, December 25, 2012

By

Marianne Digiacomo “MariHindu” (Meadville, PA) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)

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This review is from: Confessions of an American Sikh: Locked up in India, corrupt cops & my escape from a “New Age” tantric yoga cult! (Paperback)

Anyone with an interest in India, Sikhism, religion in general or the spiritual search will find this book interesting and worth a read. It’s an absolutely fascinating look into Indian culture — the good and the shockingly bad. For that aspect alone I would recommend this book. Also, it is written well and clearly, flowing well and staying interesting throughout its 60-plus chapters.

 

That said, I hoped to read more information on real, non-3Ho Sikhism. My hunger to study this spirituality is why I downloaded the book. However, there is very little of that. I would not recommend it to you if that is your reason for getting the book. There’s very little of Guru here, more of Gurusant –a story of him, him, him and his big giant ego.

 

I also must say that as a woman, and an American one, he carries an obvious disdain for women (particularly American women or any women who aren’t ultra fulfilled by smilingly obeying and serving even a horrible, unfaithful man). As a woman, this makes the book hard to enjoy, despite its interesting information. He doesn’t seem to see women as people the way men are people, but as things for men to use, like a chair or a car. He categorizes and objectifies them like things, and excuses bad treatment of women with perhaps light concern – despite its clear injustice. His stated opinions in this matter were so neandrathal, I assumed it was literary hyperbole and fully expected to see him spiritually progress from this as the book progressed. Instead, he gets the subservient eastern woman of his dreams in the post-script! I was truly surprised! He has such horrid and negative feelings and actions toward women, wonders wistfully why his marriages just didn’t work out, then blames the women for it because they should have taken it all with a smile.

 

He also shares so much about his success -and sometimes enjoyment- at being a con man, I am wondering if this book is just his latest shot at fame. His latest con, though perhaps a far less harmful one.

 

All that aside, I must say, in conclusion, that the book is both well-written and very interesting. The fact that I find him an objectionable person after reading the book is secondary.

 

 

0 of 9 people found the following review helpful

1.0 out of 5 stars terrible, December 23, 2012

By

Sikhnation – See all my reviews

This review is from: Confessions of an American Sikh: Locked up in India, corrupt cops & my escape from a “New Age” tantric yoga cult! (Paperback)

White boy needs something better to do. Not sure what the hoopla is about but I thought this book was terrible.

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